(Tourette)

Music for audiovisual performances composed by Nicolas Wiese, engendered through an excellent work of juxtaposition of pre-existing environmental sources and real instruments (xylophone, double bass, alto sax and clarinet). Besides Wiese, other musicians involved include Nice New Outfit, John Hughes and Lars Scherzberg. No qualms about concepts even remotely associated to “chords” or “melodies” here: we’re instantly incinerated by a succession of loud noises, ghost-like or otherwise warped voices, free-climbing electronics and metropolitan echoes. But there’s no risk of becoming tired: the composer knows when it’s time to stop, so that intervals of almost complete quietness are utilized as a much needed relief amidst the carnage of samples and the crescendos of anguish characterizing the large part of the record. Essentially, this sound like latter-day musique concrete with a tendency to nervous breakdown: all sounds seem designed to create anxiety in the listener, who feels perennially surrounded by something scarcely comprehensible yet unpreventable. The mechanics of intrusive imagination are put at work heavily, and often the results are not exactly what an ordinary individual would auspicate. This stuff might unsettle, or cancel at least part of your confidences; it surely makes us think hard about how wrong certain artistic canons are, especially after listening to the conclusive “Suspend values”, as disconcerting a piece as you can find. A highly recommended release.

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