(OgreOgress)

The interpretation of these intense compositions by pianist Debora Petrina achieves the difficult aim of balancing the accumulation and release of tension that’s essential in Feldman. Even at a young age – the earliest piece here is from 1943 – the composer already had well printed in his DNA a trademark style evocating shades of doubt and unanswered questions, most striking when the music is listened at low volume in a tranquil environment. The contrast between the chordal affirmations of “First piano sonata” and the sparse clusters of 1966′s “Two pieces for three pianos” resembles a path to illumination rather than a change of perspective; young Feldman put well defined frames to a vision that has been rightly considered fundamental in contemporary music’s history. What’s more, these beautiful tracks sound like opening the door of an ancient room and smelling the rememberings of something we won’t be able to catch anymore.

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