(No Type)

Aimé Dontigny (1975) is a Canadian composer, also a contributor to projects such as Napalm Jazz and Ensemble Camp. This is his first solo release, and despite not presenting anything really unexpected it sounds interesting for its large part, with a quantity of selected emotional moments as a bonus. Dontigny figures that this work would achieve maximum potential “in the margins of electroacoustic music, electronica and audio art”. It must be said that nowadays the no man’s land comprised by these definitions can accept loads of elemental artistries that aren’t always worthy of consideration, often just made of pre-existing snippets. AD avoids the typical annoyances of the “overly intellectual”, in primis by keeping things short and concise (all tracks last a few minutes or less), then enclosing parameters from distinct worlds and styles, sometimes in full-mix mode, somewhere else deepening a single concept. Thus, some parts of this record might recall a “more accessible” John Oswald, while other sections – perhaps we should call them the most lyrical ones – could be associated to a kind of nostalgic turntablism in the vein of Philip Jeck. Still, “Geisteswissenschaften” remains a pretty personal statement sounding like a hundred different snapshots – lo-fi and hi-fi, convulse yet linear, physically tolling and coldly digital at once. An apparent gathering of contradictions whose balance is exactly the necessary key to penetrate the creator’s vision. For sure one listen is not enough, and I’d also suggest beginning with an attentive scrutiny, then trying this blend as a stimulating alternative ambient. Those momentary presences and interferences will mesh with life’s soundtrack without a problem.

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