(Häpna)

Named after a Scandinavian meadow flower, “Hundloka” points its finger to that electroacoustic region that’s been visited in the past by Jim O’Rourke (circa “Happy days”) and – in some occasions – by the sadly deceased Mirror. Yet this three-movement album has an acid edge which, not too much surprisingly, is also its most distinctive trait, elevating Dahl to a superior status as opposed to being a simple “influenced by…” entity. The first segment behaves quite gently for long minutes, then the bowed strings (Dahl plays guitar, bouzouki and violin) create a gradually harsher frozenness, furtherly blemished by interference and hiss. In the second part, a percussive element appears to slap our senses but soon gets engulfed by manipulated fragments combining Hans Reichel and a punk version of AMM as heard from an out of tune radio. The final movement concludes what was previously started, introducing clarinet, recorder and computer to bring the music to that area which the composer defines, not without reason, “between the wild and the cultivated”. A landscape which I loved walking through, and the sheep on the cover just add to the genuine pleasure experienced.

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