(Allquestions)

By now, talking about Duncan’s music is like trying to describe a natural phenomenon; this is particularly true in “Infrasound-Tidal”, where John uses Australian Densil Cabrera’s sources of sound as basic material, according to principles better explained in the liner notes of this release. Divided into four basic movements, you first listen to the “sound files” of compressed tidal recordings, then to the ones reproducing earth moving and rumbling, finally to a sonic transposition of barometric pressure. The “Tidal” section is fantastic: an Eliane Radigue-like changing drone hovering around your ears and gently caressing the nerves, almost until a semi-conscious level is reached. Several soft pops and a subterranean explosion characterize the beginning of “Seismic” – and what I find peculiar here is the fact that the sound of the earth is represented with a continuous washing hiss that I’d tend to associate to the sea, instead. The hypnotic quality of sound finds its perfect definition in the final minutes, where the “Barometric” manifestation grows out of nowhere and pumps low frequencies through your feet, up to your stomach and lungs, to be finally comprehended – in a way – from your head. This is musical science at its deepest depth, confirming John Duncan’s place among the electroacoustic elite; we can’t help but looking forward to what the man will have to capture, transform and show all of us in the future.

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