(Faraway Press)

Contrarily to the usual elusiveness as far as the instrumentation is concerned, this time Andrew Chalk let us know that both these parts (6 to 10) and the first five sections of this piece, previously issued on another Faraway Press CD, were obtained with an electric guitar and the tape delay of a Ferrograph series 7 recorder, except part 8 which adds a keyboard and a two-track recorder. Maybe the composer felt the urge to reassure the listeners about the impenetrable glow of his splendid music being indeed generated by actual machines, not by ectoplasms and ghosts. Yet it should be stressed that every time I concentrate on this Englishman’s swaying beauties something strange happens (in this instance, while the rays of a weak sun filtered through the window, sudden power oscillations started to make my house’s lights flicker. Coincidence? Probably, but one likes to entertain other ideas and no, I’m not talking divine presences). The second instalment of “The river” belongs to that kind of overtone-based rapture which literally freezes; it is also a complex metallic incantation that needs a being’s inner calmness just as living organisms need oxygen. Therefore it’s clear that, in this overexcited world of slapdash mind healers, not many will be inclined to accepting of being invaded by these frequencies. There’s no sense in mixing this wonderful soundscape to the cheap occurrences of daily life; the only admissible comparisons for Chalk’s nerve-rubbing fluctuations come from a long distance, discernible but not to be seen. Did you ever manage to listen to your consciousness manifesting itself? Of course not, despite the incessant blathering of clueless charlatans who saturate their stomach with junk food and their brain with non-stop deliria. Andrew Chalk’s propagations can help to intuit that vibration, and he doesn’t even try to evoke your family traumas and childhood nightmares. That his label’s denomination contains the “faraway” adjective tells a lot. Words are useless. Sound is everything. The right sound. Where the right people are – that remains a mystery.

Advertisements