(Crouton)

A surprise awaits those who link Alessandro Bosetti exclusively to air currents fizzling in a saxophone. “Her name” is in fact a collection of seven tracks in which the Germany-based Milanese artist exploits the voices of the many people met during his tours, adapting them to the necessities of computer manipulation in addition to the timbral palette used, which includes sax, guitars, electric and acoustic piano, harmonium, electric organ, electronics, shortwave and “conversations”. Some of you could instinctively back off this juxtaposition of distorted vowels, stuttering syllables and poly-idiomatic expressions in lullaby sauce. But the sonic architecture that lies under this vocal pot pourri is functional to the movement of the parts – which, for their “conversational” origin, are not really easy to use for creative means. The outcome is a sort of post-modern “worldloungefolk” music that, somehow, I connected to Roberto Musci and Giovanni Venosta’s early releases (especially in “Mask” and “It’s me”) and, above all, with René Lussier’s “Le tresor de la langue”, but that manages to insert a few funny games into a pretty coherent structure that rewards listeners unwilling to be bounced back by an only apparent chaos and by clear – if probably involuntary – references to other people’s work. Nothing really new under the sun, then (except perhaps for the delicious “stupid hook ‘n’ shortwave” of the aptly titled “Idiot”, where even the singers can’t contain themselves from giggling for the absurdity of the situation). But nice enough for this reviewer.

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