(Emanem)

Besides being a Brazilian mammal similar to a wild boar, Caetitu is also a stunningly efficient quartet formed by Yedo Gibson (tenor sax, Eb clarinet), Veryan Weston (piano), Marcio Mattos (double bass, electronics) and Martin Blume (drum set, percussion). I was familiar with the involved musicians except Gibson, himself a Brazilian, whose style seems to be born for this ensemble: a unique cross of traditional legacies and hints to the future, his tone splendidly articulated throughout, the sense of note placement and spacing among the most satisfying ones heard recently between these walls. Weston’s playing in this circumstance emphasizes elegance and self-possession at one and the same time, neat chordal chemistries recalling memories from other eras – chamber music meets beguilingly old-fashioned jazz, melancholy-tinged progressions flourishing in the splendid “Membrance source”. Mattos might go a little unnoticed at first, after we’ve been dazzled by the insightful expertise of the main soloists, but an attentive analysis of the low-frequency regions reveals a meticulous counteraction against the glut of lawless inventiveness, as he anchors the group’s overall sound to that wide-ranging intelligibility that knowledgeable audiences expect from this calibre of artist. Blume’s percussive presence defines, once and for all, that what was formerly intended as “section” has by now been forgotten in favour of a methodical liberalization of roles. It’s life that dictates a rhythm: a drummer can’t possibly recommend patterns to someone attempting to respire through a phase of polite self-determination. Accordingly, he’s all over the place and then disappears, inimitable sensitiveness at long last revealed to glad receivers. Remarkable things, complemented by an excerpt from Chefa Alonso’s essay “Composition in motion” full of mind-stimulating truths about the fine art of improvisation.

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