(Free Software Series)

In keeping with the libertarian policies of about anything established by Basque artistic agitator Mattin, the Free Software Series make use of the chance of producing music unyoked from the obligations of copyright, and I believe that an initial statement better than this fabulous offering by Tim Blechmann couldn’t possibly have been made. “Re-reading”, recorded in a live performance in 2006, is a laptop composition that would not be out of place on a label like Antifrost, in that it’s a masterful exercise in restrained violence amidst gradual mutations. A slowly unfolding, cirriform piece based on granular crackle and ever-growing, sinisterly hissing whirrs which nevertheless leave the scenario they depict available for observation at all times, reminiscent of the most impenetrable aspects of the work of pioneers such as John Duncan, but also early Daniel Menche and – why not – Bernhard Günter: the last fifteen minutes contain sonic data of such a subtlety that it’s difficult to perceive their essential functionality without the aid of headphones or a dead silent environment. Blechmann shows great maturity in applying strictly rigorous rules to his sound, the outcome being a record that doesn’t really appear as a real-time recording but bears the characteristics of a painstakingly conceived studio track. The most perceptive among the listeners will certainly appreciate the infinitesimal reiterative currents that characterize several of these icy passages, underlining through their presence the ripening of frequencies that, in an ideal world, should delineate human evolution. Things that, inevitably, are reserved for few lucky ones.

Advertisements