(And/OAR / Alluvial)

The TNT cultural centre in Bordeaux was filled by “several hundred meters of cables” by Eric Cordier, Jean-Luc Guionnet and Eric La Casa, who proceeded to record the internal and external sonorities of the area by placing a large amount of condenser and contact microphones, whose captured sounds were altered/processed and sent to a 32-channel mixer, then played in the building through eight loudspeakers. The appreciable balance obtained by Afflux is demonstrated by the results achieved by this writer during consecutive listening sessions: at a good level with windows closed, the overall mix deploys a rapture of motors, trains and urban clattering juxtaposing the sublime acoustic aura of a peripheral metropolitan zone and the danger of walking in a street alone at night. But if you let these recollections fuse with the sounds of life coming from outside – which in my case included a cuckoo, a distant jet and the faraway voices of a few Sunday country walkers among the rest – you could even feel entitled to some moment of monastic pondering alleviating this era’s insecurity and mental tiredness for a while.

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